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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
, kathy. it's because of her i'm here today and here at the city university. i sworn after i left maryland having left rutgers i would not go back to the university again. i'm glad i have broken that promise to myself and here. it's a pleasure to be on the podium again. we met in the '70s what we were both regarded as a radical scholar. some might not think that anymore. francis and i were asked by james mcgreger burns to be the co-chair of the american political science invention program. we came up with a program that even i think jim burns was a little alarmed by. he in fact put in to action. i have known francis since then. she has remained an honest and authentic voice of progressivism and radicalism with a deep interest with those they have shown -- the homeless and the poor. not how they can be helped but how they find ways to help themselves through the movement and work that they do. it's a pleasure to have her perspective this afternoon in responding to these comments. i'm very pleasured to jackie davis, the chairman of the -- and rachel and members of the executive committee the
>> for more information on tvs recent visit to santa fe, new mexico another city visited by her local content vehicle, visit c-span.org/local content. ..a?xx i first came to washington, d.c. in 2000 as a congressional correspondent for the associated press. after spending several years in colombia south carolina and albany new york. now, i am originally from mississippi, the son of two public school teachers come in and being from mississippi, the one thing my parents made sure that i knew was my history. it was almost a state requirement in mississippi to know where you came from. so, when i left mississippi to go to south carolina, i had this desire to history and i studied the history of south carolina. i didn't the same thing when i went to upstate new york. i got involved in learning the african-american history of upstate new york which, by the way, is very vibrant. a lot of the underground railroads ended in upstate new york city have a very vibrant african-american community and history up there. but when i left albany new york to come to washington, d.c., and i knew i
was cutting through the middle of the city. with citizens of both sides fearing the brink of world war iii, freed wandered close to the boundary of the divided city. neither on assignment, nor with a predetermined vision who he ended up finding and seeing the most through his camera were american g.i.s. but here at the the wall in its nascent days, freed snapped a photograph of an unnamed black soldier standing at the edge of the american sector. freed's contact sheets from this trip confirm that this image was powerfully a single shot. taken at a middle distance in black and white, freed stands with his subject between a set of trolley tracks that culminate into the imposed boundary of the wall behind them. this encounter haunted freed. it set him off course and beckoned his return from exile to come back to america to confront segregation and racism. image would end up being the first photograph in "black and white america," and as ap annotation in the book, freed sets this out as its point of departure. he writes: we, he and i, two americans, we meet silently, and we part silently. impr
tv. for a complete schedule, visit booktv.org. >> from new york city, now, michelle rhee, former chancellor of the d.c. public school system, recounts her career and present her thoughts on education reform. this event is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> michelle, firstly, thank you very much for joining us. i know you've had a couple busy days from last evening, jon stewart, cnn's piers morgan, and we're really delighted to have our old friends here from c-span filming this event so that many people from across the united states can benefit from a lot of what michelle has to say. so just to kick start it this evening, michelle, how did you come up with a fascinating and interesting book, "radical," and where does this interesting name come from? >> so i think the genesis of the name is an interesting one in that when i first got to d.c. it was the lowest performing and most dysfunctional school district in the entire nation, and that was a pretty widely-known truth. and, um, so i started doing things that i thought were of course for a school district in that kind of state. i, you know, started clos
pressure or -- [inaudible] in their real place per se. in the capital city. and the diplomacy with them and real life with them. in substance of how they behave at the u.n. we don't think the u.n. is that important. we don't wind up forcing them to take account of our positions on things many of which matter us. at least in the general assembly. we don't think it's worth the price we have to pay and the real world relationship with them in their own country. and we don't -- it means there's a disconnect between how we and our allies behave at the u.n. versus what our frequently far better relationships are directly in the capital. >> host: who are the new liberal realists you talk about in your book? >> guest: the obama administration came in split between two quite different camps. in the foreign policy. on the one hand you had a waive of people that i would describe typical describe liberal international. people believe in the mission of the u.n. to not just be the kind of diplomatic table where everybody negotiates and argues and debates and let's their views be known. something whic
, and we must thank the city of savannah department of cultural affairs, festival upon spores, members, and individual donors for their support. it is because of them that we are able to bring you these esteemed authors for free. if you enjoyed today's speakers and would like to make a donation to the festival, we've provided yellow buckets at the door when you exit. please consider giving to our bucket list for next year's gifted scribes. before we get started, i just have a couple of housekeeping notes for you. please take a moment to silence your cell phones. i had to do that myself. okay. immediately following his presentation, mr. gore will be signing copies of his book. please go to the fellowship hall which is located directly behind the pulpit, and you go out the doors and around, and a right turn as you enter the exit the sanctuary. there's volunteers outside to direct you. mr. gore will be able to sign 400 books, and you must have the numbered card that was included with your book purchase. your signing order will correspond with your card number, and you will be called in gr
, a historian, author and professor of history at columbia university, and james stifel that city university of new york and the author of "freedom national" the topic of tonight's discussion. a book that was research at the new york public library at the center for scholars and writers and i was the director of libraries of the new york public library. >> our other panelists will sign books in the lobby after the program. please join me in welcoming to the stage. [applause] >> good evening. i'm glad to see all of you here. wonderful audience. we are going to have a conversation we hope discussing and then we will take questions from the audience. i am sure do have a lot and i hope he will not be shy about asking them. want to start first with a gem and asking a question about the book about the title of the book and some terms you used that people may not understand, freedom national. estimate it comes from a speech that charles sumner gave as a u.s. senator the speech was called the sectional and first there are two things. it's a constitutional doctrine the political revolution is in the
ago in new york city we broke the guinness world record. we were trying to break the guinness world record for most secret decoder rings used in one place. that is the nerdest thing you can do with your -- nerdiest thing you can do with your time ever. we broke the record, it was great. nothing was nerdier except being in a bookstore on a friday night, people, okay? [laughter] so just, i pity all of us really, all of us. um, i want to say the most important thing of all. it will be, i promise, the most important thing i will say tonight, and that is thank you. everything i say after that will be straight downhill, and i'll tell you, i'll save some of the specific thank yous for the end. what we're here to talk about is "the fifth assassin," and people always say where do you get your ideas for books? i'll tell you about this store. because of dakota, no one gets crazier mail than me. like, the last time i was at this store for the inner circle, someone brought me the holy grail, okay? is that guy here? is the guy -- i have to ask first. he's not here? then let's talk about him, okay
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)